£8 senior tickets for end March.£2 booking fee. Free drink bottle

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Teachers Night at William Morris Gallery E17

That was something else: a free evening at the Gallery in all its glory for teachers and those imparting knowledge. I’d been to cultural evenings before following the refurbishment of the magnificent old house and am used to the old now brilliant white staircase up to the top and the once squeaky floorboards. Imagine the maids in days of yore; up and down fetching and carrying for ole Bill and his ilk.

The main temporary exhibition is ….wait for it…..awesome. I loved it. I saw creams and browns, witches and spiders. Kinda topical!

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There were free demonstrations for the attending teachers all about textiles and prints and weaving and block printing and there was free wine with nuts.

So many people I know in Leyton have no idea where is William Morris Gallery, let alone the Village.

The moon was high and nigh on full. It was good to see the viewing gallery from the outside in the dark and to get a show from the coloured lights inside.

Coming soon….

RAG 3WORKS

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Friday 18th October. Let’s go!

Club Games 2013 for 55 years+ Friday 18 October Brixton Recreation Centre

 

The eighth Club Games will be bigger and better than ever, with hundreds of competitors and spectators coming from all over the capital and beyond.

We aim to encourage and promote a healthy and active lifestyle to people of all ages. The Club Games invites competitors aged 55 and over to compete in a wide range of fun sport and leisure activities.

Sports on offer include: • Badminton • Darts • Dominoes • Indoor bowls • Short mat bowls • Short tennis • Table tennis • Timed swim • Timed bike ride

If you would like to come and support your local team it will cost £2.00 which includes a tea or coffee on arrival.

For more information email
clubgames@gll.org

 

Issue 42 Up Your Street

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Mon 14th Oct £3 1.30-4.30pm Tea Dance Stratford Old Town Hall. E15. Dance, sit, drink tea. eat cake.

Wed 16th Oct  free   10-noon  Lloyd Park Sharing Heritage usual weekly meeting.

                             free   5 – 7pm at Timberlodge. Stratford Community Networking Night

Thurs 17th Oct free   2-8pm Metro-pads office by Walthamstow Station. Look at the plans for Walthamstow Centre redevelopment with Solum.

                              free  8pm. The New Black and Birkbeck at Stratford Picturehouse E15 present a screening of  “Who Needs A Heart?”

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Sun 2oth Oct free 2.30pm Walking with David Boote and Walking Free In Waltham Forest “Up The Ching” as 8th October (see issue 41)

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Reminiscing in a launderette.

Years and years ago when rats roamed Walthamstow and up by Eden Road the houses had wooden porches full of umbrellas, wellies and paraffin heaters, when velvet curtains were the rage and guaranteed to last twenty years and they did! when the Asian Centre was a twinkle in the chimney smoke sky then I heard that my cousin had a butcher’s shop in Beulah Road. She was Carol Bell as a singleton. I never knew her married name. Full of curiosity partly because no-one in my family ever owned anything I went along to see her imagining she with a stripey apron and a cleaver raised above her peroxided head. Blow me down, the couple had moved out and away the day before. Look below for a mention of Horsey’s Butchers back in the fifties so there really was a butcher’s.

Beulah Road in Walthamstow is special now. It is in the Sacré Coeur of Waltham Forest, the conservation area away from the new builds down by the station, in the heart of the Village of E17 .The road name  is exotic and there’s even a Beulavilla. Don’t tell me Beulah Road is named after Warner’s sister’s husband’s auntie’s grandmother. The name belongs to Downton.

Today I went to do a reccie on the Deep Clean Launderette deep cleanand am certain it’s on the old butcher shop site.

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There I met some women and we got talking. Here was a rehearsal then for the “Hanging Words Out To Dry” reminiscence workshop and writing stimulus happening on 7th November. I needed to see if there were chairs for the seniors to perch on for two hours on that morning.

2 laundry

PS Beulah, Eden, Biblical, (Blake?) roads built around St Mary’s Church E17

Look at this from Linda Hall b 1947 nee Wiley off Richard Dunn’s Walthamstow History website.

My name is Linda Hall formerly Wiley and I now reside in Vancouver, Canada.

I used to live in Beulah Road in Westcotts Laundry         where my Mum Win Wiley managed the laundry. In the tiny little accommodation         above and behind there resided my Brother Anthony (known as Tony in later         years) my Dad, Nan and Granddad. There was an outside loo and a tin bath         hanging on the outside wall that was bought into the the scullery for         “bath night” once a week. I was born in 1947 and my Brother         in 1944. We both went to Maynard Road infant school and then Junior. Our         secondary modern school was Joseph Barret later to become Warwick Road         with the Girls having their own school built down the road. My brother         left Joseph Barret and went on to Tom Hood Technical College. As a teenager         I used to go to The Mambo Youth Club that was held in Maynard Road Junior         school Hall.

On our side of Beulah Road there was Horsey’s the         Butchers, a wool shop, a sweet shop, a second hand stall where the Friers         lived and then the laundry. Further down there was a removal company where         a friend of mine named Edna lived and then there was a grocery store where         they used to pat 2 ounces of butter together behind a pale green shield.         That is as far as I can remember on our side. Opposite us there was Cundys         the Greengrocers and a sweetshop. Way further down there was a barbers         and a chemist and a few other shops but can’t think now what they were.

After school every afternoon I was sent round to         Scotts the Bakers in Orford Road for a small tin loaf or a large one depending         on the circumstances, either way by the time I got home I had picked and         eaten the end off. It smelled so good I couldn’t resist. There was a big         fish shop almost adjacent, then my mind goes blank until Isons the Oil         Shop where we got our paraffin from and anything else you may need. It         was like Alladins cave. Cross Eden Road and you came to the Post Office,         Button Factory The Connaught Cafe, where I spent my teenage years drinking         coke and sharing one cigarette between two people. There was the TA training         centre on the corner of Orford/Beulah. Opposite side of Orford Road was         the Connaught Hospital and further down there was a house that did Ballet,         Tap, Singing lessons and Piano. I did the Ballet and Tap but for the life         of me can’t remember what it was called. There was the Greengrocer who         used to stand outside his shop and say Good Morning to everybody, wearing         a lovely clean white apron.         There was a sweet shop whose owners emigrated to Australia. I think their         Daughter’s name was Linda. As I read this I realize how many blanks there         are. Of course I am forgetting the Queens head pub on the corner.

My Husband and I along with our kids emigrated         to Canada in 1982 but go back every year as we still have lots family         and so we have seen many changes through the years. In 2011 I did a memory         lane walk around Old Walthamstow. The laundry is still there albeit under         a different name. Scotts Bakery is still there, again under a different         name. Isons name is still above the shop

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Stories of Migration….again

Up at Leytonstone Library E11 about twenty-three adults and a couple of kiddies waited patiently for the other seven or more audience members to roll in late so we could enjoy some plays. The MC aka playwright/director Paula David told us the four sketches represented the stories told to her by Caribbean people who were immigrants back in the day i.e 1950s to 1980s.

The venue is cosy, shabby and informal. The set on the stage was similar. There was no colour or brightness as the background to miserable personal real accounts acted out by stationary actors including Trevor David and Anthony Chisholm punctuated by the in and outs of an actress playing the part of a newscaster over the decades. The scripts attempted to heighten our senses of what Caribbean immigrants felt during Windrush times and later . When I say senses I mean the colours, the sounds, the smells. I got grey, bathroom damp, and green army uniforms smelling of the earth.

Story-telling on stage is what I visited today. No magic appeared.

Oh yawn. Haven’t we done all this? In the eighties? In the late seventies? Haven’t we the older generation, 50 plus in years, heard all the stories yet? Lenny Henry’s done his stories of first generation Caribbeans to death and now reclines richly on Premier beds.The local youth may have been expected but were absent today. They may have liked the stories but would have wanted action. “Stories of Migration” will likely go into schools. .

This is theatre rather than research and literature so I expected to be drawn in. I was. I expected to be entertained. I wasn’t. I expected surprises. None. I expected theatre. Nope.

The acting was what it was. The actors were mostly alone on the stage with their monologues. They mulled over scripted accounts which were personal histories and many of the audience members will have heard the same kind of stories from their grans and in a couple of cases experienced being in the fifties and head butting with “the grey Better life”. The best line was from the Grenadian who joined the British police force and recognised when he said, as he slid through a career trailing  in the odious remains of a colonial beast staffed by rude irritated white commanders,  “Racism became easier ” (to deal with).

What grants can do eh?

In the audience was Baden Prince Junior. Twas a pleasure to meet again the poet and teacher whose phrase “Don’t be clever, Trevor” is the best way to stop his workshop students of any age over-rhyming.

Don’t be clever, Trevor.

The event today was one out of the many thrown into the mix of “Words Over Waltham Forest”.

I did recommend that anyone wanting to participate in Peter Ashan’s forthcoming Heritage Project centred around immigration stories from  African-Caribbean and Asian Waltham Forest residents 1940-1990 get along to “Stories of Migration. That forthcoming project will be coming to an Asian centre near you! Funding presumed.

Thank you Waltham Forest Libraries for giving the public the opportunity to see free theatre. I’m certain I’m the only one who tells the libraries in advance if I’m not coming as is requested on the Eventbrite booking form. All the empty seats today eh? Fool me.

Three Mills in Stratford is doing a workshop day in October for £39 instead of £120 all about the creative process in film. Hmm.

And there’s more…On Thursday 10th October 6.30pm at Tower Hamlets Archives, 227 Bancroft Rd E1 (205 bus) almost opposite the estate where Billy Ocean grew up (yeah!) there’s an introduction to “Where I Belong” the local oral history project capturing (!) Asian and Black women’s herstories (!) of residency in Tower Hamlets. Free. Open to all.