World War 1 commemoration through words and art

Local Heroes project workshops, taking place at the Memorial Community Church, 395 Barking Road, E13 8AL. The dates are now confirmed and are as follows:

  • Tuesday 5th August 2-4pm
  • Tuesday 12th August 2-4pm
  • Tuesday 19th August 2-4pm
  • Tuesday 26th August 2-4pm
  • Monday 1st September 2-4pm
  • Monday 8th September 2-4pm

It is a series of free workshops and you must be available to attend all of them. If you could please reply to David he would be happy to confirm your place. It’s all about heritage and locality and using ancestry.co.uk

  • Visit the fantastic Memorial Community Church Bells and hear them in action
  • Learn how to use online archive research tools such as ancestry.co.uk
  • Research some of the names on the bells to find out information about the local men that died in the first world war
  • Respond artistically to the theme of the WW1 memorial through interactive workshops using both writing skills (working with a writer/poet) and art skills (working with a visual artist)
  • Please contact

 

David Allies-Curtis on 02075111117 at Rosetta Art Centre in West Ham

issue 26 Up Your Street

Up Your Street issue 26

 

Sat 26th July  free  10.30 am-4pm with a walk at 11 and  a talk at 3pm  Narrow Way, Hackney. Not sure if the walk is free.

Pop along to the Narrow Way at the top of Mare Street for a special day with Hackney Museum filled with something for everyone!

                                 20p 10-2pm table top sale with the Cat and Kitten Care at Spruce Hill Baptist Church Brookscroft Rd E17 .

Tues 29th July free  2pm  Claremont Singers sing at Culpeper Gardens Islington.

Sat 2nd Aug      free 1-6pm Walthamstow Village  Festival.

Eid Mubarek to subscribers acknowledging Ramadan.

seniors art school

10-12th Sept 2014  11-3.30pm. with Alex Julyan at Dilston Grove, Southwark Park. free for 60 + seniors.Book in advance learning@cgplondon.org

‘Born in 1962 Alex Julyan is an artist who lives and works in London. Her works are constructed from a wide rang of abandoned materials, as well as texts and fabricated elements. By applying a quiet, investigative wit to familiar objects, spaces and situations, she subverts their individual and universal properties and shifts the familiar references that define them.

Her collaborative projects are characterized by exchanges across art forms and include large-scale events which explore the territory between music, theatre and installation.
“The artwork I have made for Held in the Hand is part of a collection of  sculptures that take their reference point from machines and gadgets. I’m interested in our growing dependency on technology coupled with our increasing inability to understand its workings. The built-in redundancy of most technology provides me with an interesting set of questions, ideas and contradictions to play with. I own a number of old engineering manuals and enjoy looking at the complex drawings and photographs of various components and parts for larger machines. My sculptures are hybrids, made from looking at different images and combining them to make something new.” ‘

Blog post: the built environment appreciation club

Arundel Square yeah! arundel 2

 

arundelI love this place because my mum has history here and it ain’t ‘arf posh. The buildings, the built environment are steeped in Victorian social history and all I’ve done since coming in out of the torturous sun is Google about Liverpool Road N7 and N1 and all about the architecture and Eaton Square in SW1. Same same. All my life I knew that “Upstairs, Downstairs” was filmed in Arundel Square. Grr. Not so. It was Eaton Square in Bloomsbury, London. To the untrained eye,  the style of buildings/homes are the same in Arundel and Eaton Squares. A Cubitt as in Cubitt Gallery in Angel Mews,  Pentonville Road  designed the Eaton lot and had the land in Arundel area where he had a brick-making firm which supplied his Bloomsbury works. Probably all wrong but sounds feasible.

Anyway I said “posh” and actually Circle 33 own the above apartments so it’s all social housing; all those basements and lovely steps and railings and balconies and not forgetting the “horns” on the sash windows.

 

With Building Exploratory from Cowcross Street a group of we gorgeous seniors  (all in floral summery tops) went walkabout in order to follow through a visit to an architect last April or so when it was teeming down with rain. The architect had built the new houses/flats next to the concrete slab on top of ye olde railway. There was an engineering feat there of mammoth proportions. Concrete? I thought that was a no-no word. So Arundel Square as in four sides was completed very recently about four years ago. One of our group today actually lives on the square. She is a beautiful calm young woman and emerged from her palace to tell us all about Pocock’s Fields and George Vth and squatters in buses.She’s not a Buildings Exploratory member because she’s too young. One day.

What a great time we had. It was baking hot. Gradually the park filled up with mothers in hijabs, kiddies in World Cup tee-shirts, toddlers on scooters and ladies walking pooches.

I discovered Liverpool Road’s length all the way to The Angel, familiar territory;  popped into crowded McDonalds in Chapel Street Market, then went onto the Claremont Project and signed up for myself and mates to go on art workshops. And why not?

Head banging from being out in the heat and failing to drink water. Tut.

 

Breakfast in Southwark

Register to go to Southwark on Fri 25th July  at 0830-1000h to enjoy free breakfast and a 20 minute presentation then chatting with creatives at the Creative Mornings London’s monthly event. Sometimes the event is nearer the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park so I advertise it anyway. Go to their website and check out everything . This week’s tipic is “Heritage”. It’s a buzzing affair.

 

 

“Galahad Clark is a 6th generation shoemaker.

Galahad’s unique heritage meant growing up immersed in a world that honored tradition and pushed boundaries of design innovation. As a teenager, he spent summer holidays on various shoe production lines in Europe learning the family’s trade.

After finishing school in Somerset, Galahad was offered a Morehead Scholarship at the University of North Carolina, where he earned a degree with honors in Chinese and Anthropology. While there he founded ‘Students 4 Students International’, an organization created to help disadvantaged students in Africa go to the best secondary schools and onto university. There are now three such projects thriving around the world.

Galahad’s degree led him to Taiwan and China, where he studied the language and researched technical shoe production and, when back in the US, he designed and developed ‘Wu-Shoes’ for hip-hop trailblazers, Wu Tang Clan.

In 2003, Galahad took over Terra Plana and set about transforming the brand by introducing new concepts. Every product was designed with a sustainable concept in mind, and eco-friendly materials were actively sourced from all corners of the world. According to Galahad, “sustainable design is just good design. Products that work in the world today – are efficient, durable, lightweight, appropriate, functional, beautiful”

From the base of Terra Plana Galahad launched UNITED NUDE, WORN AGAIN and VIVOBAREFOOT. And as of 2012 focuses on VIVOBAREFOOT: the original and authentic barefoot shoe with a patented, ultra-thin, puncture-resistant sole that allows the body to move as nature intended.

Galahad continues to serve on the board of United Nude and Worn Again (brands he founded) and the Crossway Foundation.

Outside of work, Galahad lives in Rurban retreat just outside London with his wife and two children.”

artspeke

Starting with sketches and studies, the paintings develop into highly designed arrangements between the object and its setting. Placed in flat open spaces designed to push and pull the visual plane; platonic, familiar shapes become altered in scale. A plain, ordinary jug becomes chiselled and monumental, and simple recognizable outlines are endowed with a presence beyond their everyday, common use. Textures, which relate directly or indirectly to the subject, are woven into the paintings. These link interior and exterior areas and present a layer of tactility into the composition. The end result is a dynamic counter balance of shape, colour and surface, providing a window into the quiet but vibrant world of the familial