Keeping up with the art.

Went to the William Morris Gallery and was happy to see a face I know and respect, the poet and social activist Roger Huddle. Then I saw Fiona Bruce, the little doll. There she was coming up the stairs behind Roger. Obviously she was there for a photo shoot or trailer or film for “Antiques Road Show ” which occurs at Walthamstow Town Hall grounds tomorrow. Roger was there to make residents’ encounter with a high-up artist  go to plan and smoothly. Fiona Bruce is beautiful.

 

 

 

 

TwoHeadsAtOnce_542This one not my photo…

All other photos here are mine…

Yinkayinka 6yinka 5

Most of us in the queue of eight had no idea what Yinka Shonibare’s art in the community was all about but were obviously up for something on our own turf in the majesty of buildings. Good thing I dressed well today because we were there not for an audition but for a photo-shoot. After that and a Quality Street I went downstairs to meet the artist. I was humbled for I love Yinka’s work. There he was quietly poised in his wheelchair. There I was mouthy as ever and shaking his hand letting him know that I love his headless figures attired in Manchester printed of African-design dresses.  Turns out Yinka, MBE will reconstruct an old photo of the people associated with the Gallery in his own unique way using some of us hopefuls. Good luck everyone.

“Yeah but is it only white people he wants?”

“Don’t matter; he cuts off their head anyway.”

Peeped into the tea room. Saw  women with pink streaks in their hair and Earl Grey in their cups. In my head I raved about  the mauve Michaelmas Daisies out front, saw the W11 and ran.

Simon Cowell later.

 

Disobedient Objects

                               A few Up Your Streeters went into the “Disobedient Objects” free exhibition at the V&A. Here was a crammed-in collection of ephemera representing grass roots events which spurred on social change. It was all very like a student’s bedroom with walls plastered in posters, pictures, banners and badges. Too much at once and too many people milling around, treading on toes. I was not amazed by the patchwork quilts full of the DNA of women at Greenpeace, nor by anything else but I will try it all again because the title is great. Was it put together by a curator’s intern? Not possible. Those unpaid twenty-somethings haven’t a clue about the alternative histories, do they? (I read the blogs from the technicians who mounted the objects. Paint drying times.)

                                  Not one of our senior Muslim women went for a glance. Maybe they are dis-engaged from the struggles of the past. In the seventies they had their own issues to deal with, like their neighbours,  as they shifted factory hours around husband and children upbringing. Same aged West Indian women recognized the Greenpeace section, swished by,  and again reminisced about putting food on the table and keeping in line in a host country.

                                 The journey home was funny as women in our group talked about their reasons for having cleaners. I told them how I was aghast that my sister paid a woman to do her ironing and the irony was lost as I told them how I queried my sister’s behaviour as after all she had a husband who could learn how to iron. One woman cleans her floor then uses vintage hessian rice bags to walk over the laminates as the floor dries. Another takes two hours to tidy up before the cleaner arrives. I remember being surprised that families in Hampstead employed me to do their washing up on Christmas Day. I should think Jonathan Goodluck employs young girls as house-girls rather than educating them.

                             Last Year I chucked out all my “Spare Rib” magazines.

.                                                                   spare rib to Patrick Vernon

Yinka Shonibare in E17. Crikey!

“Yinka Shonibare MBE RA was born in London and moved to Lagos, Nigeria at the age of three. He returned to London to study Fine Art first at Byam Shaw College of Art (now Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design) and then at Goldsmiths College, where he received his MFA, graduating as part of the ‘Young British Artists’ generation. He currently lives and works in the East End of London.

Over the past decade, Shonibare has become well known for his exploration of colonialism and post-colonialism within the contemporary context of globalisation. TwoHeadsAtOnce_542(Not my photo)

Shonibare’s work explores these issues, alongside those of race and class, through the media of painting, sculpture, photography and, more recently, film and performance. Using this wide range of media, Shonibare examines in particular the construction of identity and tangled interrelationship between Africa and Europe and their respective economic and political histories. Mixing Western art history and literature, he asks what constitutes our collective contemporary identity today. Having described himself as a ‘post-colonial’ hybrid, Shonibare questions the meaning of cultural and national definitions.

Shonibare was a Turner prize nominee in 2004 and awarded the decoration of Member of the “Most Excellent Order of the British Empire”. He has added this title to his professional name. In 2013 he was elected Royal Academician by the Royal Academy of Arts. He was notably commissioned by Okwui Enwezor At Documenta 10 in 2002 to create his most recognised work ‘Gallantry and Criminal Conversation’ that launched him on an international stage. He has exhibited at the Venice Biennial and internationally at leading museums worldwide. In September 2008, his major mid-career survey commenced at the MCA Sydney and toured to the Brooklyn Museum, New York in June 2009 and the Museum of African Art at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC in October 2009 . In 2010, ‘Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle’ became his first public art commission on the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square.”

Sat 30th Aug. free.2-4pm for LBWF residents.Check out William Morris Gallery for a special event with Yinka. Refreshments too.

Issue 30 up Your Street

 

 

 

Up Your Street issue 30.

Thanks to Mary F for sharing. this:-

“Yinka Shonibare MBE RA was born in London and moved to Lagos, Nigeria at the age of three. He returned to London to study Fine Art first at Byam Shaw College of Art (now Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design) and then at Goldsmiths College, where he received his MFA, graduating as part of the ‘Young British Artists’ generation. He currently lives and works in the East End of London.

Over the past decade, Shonibare has become well known for his exploration of colonialism and post-colonialism within the contemporary context of globalisation. Shonibare’s work explores these issues, alongside those of race and class, through the media of painting, sculpture, photography and, more recently, film and performance. Using this wide range of media, Shonibare examines in particular the construction of identity and tangled interrelationship between Africa and Europe and their respective economic and political histories. Mixing Western art history and literature, he asks what constitutes our collective contemporary identity today. Having described himself as a ‘post-colonial’ hybrid, Shonibare questions the meaning of cultural and national definitions.

Shonibare was a Turner prize nominee in 2004 and awarded the decoration of Member of the “Most Excellent Order of the British Empire”. He has added this title to his professional name. In 2013 he was elected Royal Academician by the Royal Academy of Arts. He was notably commissioned by Okwui Enwezor At Documenta 10 in 2002 to create his most recognised work ‘Gallantry and Criminal Conversation’ that launched him on an international stage. He has exhibited at the Venice Biennial and internationally at leading museums worldwide. In September 2008, his major mid-career survey commenced at the MCA Sydney and toured to the Brooklyn Museum, New York in June 2009 and the Museum of African Art at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC in October 2009 . In 2010, ‘Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle’ became his first public art commission on the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square.”

Sat 30th Aug. free.2-4pm for LBWF residents.Check out William Morris Gallery for a special event with Yinka. Refreshments too.

Sat 30th Aug free Hackney Wick Festival.

 

Tues 2nd Sept free Drumming daytime class for all at St Joseph’s Hospice Finding Space. Phone to book a place.

Wed 3rd Sept free Yinka project 3pm (see Aug 30).

Thurs 4th Sept free  Chinese inspired relaxation and massage to lift your mood. Afternoon (time  to be confirmed) at Quaker House Jewel Rd E17 (thanks to Chin for sharing this).

Coming soon at Birkbeck Uni E15 a discussion about the proposal for a new community hub as part of Legacy 2012 plus a tour around about. Book at Eventbrite. That’s Wed Sept 17th free 6-9pm “East London In Flux”

 

Fri 5th Sept free Yinka project (see Aug 30)

 

 

 

 

Hang on there.

Up Your Street as a community group met up at The V&A today to enjoy the Wedding exhibition, something about definitive collection museum Hartnell. To we it’s an expensive gig if we’re paying the full whack and believe us it’s not worth a Castlemaine XXXX. it’s a wedding dress history of the moneyed class back in the day 1843 and coming forward. It’s okay; it’s not stunning .There’s a little nod to multi-culturalism  and funnily enough, the uninteresting African design matched for the bride and the groom is at least stuck on mannequins with some heftiness about them. It’s Rock n Roll if you’re at the party.

Downstairs in the space reminiscent of a tiered wedding cake (yep! Spotted) are the trains, dresses and corsets of those without bodies in the 1930s and 1800s. There was no insight into the lives of the wearers unless that meant newspaper cuttings about the celebrities i.e, the landowning rich and their nuptials. It was not a willingly shared history. We were looking over the fence and wondering how poor were the seamstresses sewing pearls into seams and zips into secret hideaways.

Daniel had a walking stick and a bag of goodies. We waited for each other as some were forging new friendships over the reading of descriptions next to crazy wild dresses on the cake’s upper tier.. Outdoors kiddies were splashing in the pool. Out came our chocolate wafers, fizzy drink and fruit of course. The place was busy.

What was good was the sight of wheelchairs in every cubby hole in the Museum. Bit like bicycles in Amsterdam. Pick up ride and put down.

The lift was out. In a whole big famous building the lift was broken so people with weak legs did not see what was upstairs. Suddenly it was working then the doors wouldn’t open.

Poor show. 

Mirabelle Plums

This morning on what looks like the first day of November I gathered in my bumper crop off the lawn and watched the yellow plums fall from above in the rain showers.. My neighbours had been scrumping last week and I am not one to waste vitamined fruit. I busied over a hot stove and made jars of jam resenting all that expensive sugar I had to use. The jam straight from the pot had a sharpness about it. Yuk. I Googled for any tips besides the one about adding a pod of vanilla. I followed some advice and left my jams to rest awhile. Success. Yummy. Mirabelle Plum jam. jamApparently Romanian folk eat the inviting little ones straight off the tree so I felt for my other neighbours who could only pine as they watched my boughs bend and they dreamt of home.

Today a ceasefire was declared in Gaza. Nothing on the news about that yet. It’s all about Scotland.