Up Your Street Issue 1 2015

 Up Your Street  Issue 1 2015
Mon    5th Jan      £2 per session 1-3pm Open Art comprising beading, painting and drawing
                             at Centre for Better Health
                                 1a Darnley Rd Hackney 

Wed    7th Jan     free      "Stories of El Salvador" film and exhibition at Rich Mix E1(ongoing)

Sat      10th Jan   free 10.30-12.30 Book at Eventbrite for a 20 minute session. Taster session of Reflexology
Hale End Library E4

free Hackney Museum Last week of exhibition about the retired nurses

from the Caribbean.

                                                        The Museum is shut on Sundays and Mondays.

Mon     12th Jan £25 for 10 weeks/ Pay in advance .10-12noon Ceramics for beginners course.
                                       Centre For Better Health (see address above)

Wed    14th Jan free 7.30-9.30pm Union Chapel Highbury N1 Bach  interludes. Book at Eventbrite
Thur     15th Jan free 6-9pm BowArts by Bow Church.Private View.no need to book.

Mary Barnes: Boo-Bah


Art in Bow

Some subscribers to Up Your Street aka teachers’ assistants and community leaders, enrolled onto a teachers’ development session at Bowarts by Bow Church

Artist                               Nathanphoto credit to ArtStack

Nathan Eastwood

“Nathan Eastwood lives in Newham and has a studio in Bethnal Green. He graduated from Byam Shaw School of Fine Art in 2009, and has gone on to exhibit in a range of shows including the Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition (2013), Contemporary British Painting at The Crypt, St Marylebone (2013); and Towards a New Socio-Painting, a Transition Gallery touring show this year.

Drawing inspiration from the Kitchen Sink Painters of the 1950s, Eastwood’s paintings describe small moments in everyday life in meticulous detail, from cleaning the bathroom to mulling thoughts over a cup of tea. Layering humbrol enamel paint on board and a grey palate, Nathan builds up layers of paint to create images which are both photorealistic, yet riddled with imperfections of trapped dust and hair and loose brushwork.”(BowArts website)

….work,/ recreation/. Freedom  photographs all in black and white

Everyone enjoyed the workshop.Here’s a review by Sue.”Very interesting and interactive group
1. Asked to choose a photograph on display, and describe the feeling or emotion
when looking at it (individual )
2. Did a chart of white, pale black, medium black and dark black.. Using lead
pencils and charcoal
3.worked in group of 3….2 held a card frame in front of a picture and the
other had to draw what he/ she could see through the frame. Every one had a turn
to draw.
4. Talk about the light when taking picture etc.

After the chart , we had to copy one of the chosen pictures . I did a caricature of a black man  with a cigarette in his right hand , a small distance from his lips… I saw it as a shot at recreation. I noticed the way he dressed and how he enjoyed his fag.”

It’s been a week of art.

It’s been a week of art and it’s not over until the fat lady sings; there’s RAGWORKS to measure and catalogue ready for October 16th. Time flies.

Just caught up on BBC Iplayer to get up to date with what’s occurring in the planet of established art and saw Zephaniah and Goldie doin’ Matisse and Turner. Fresh take on things and a change from Tim Marlow who I last saw trying to get any considered responses from Bailey about the whys and wherefores of photography and legacy. That was painful and Marlow was a dog with a rag. He actually put words into Bailey’s mouth. Way to interview! Job done.

Zephaniah was interested in Turner’s depictions of slavery and he investigated an huge painting “The Slave Ship”. Ole Zeph was not in his culture comfort zone or rather responded way too emotionally to art. It was a case of “I know what I like and I like what I know”. There were some great camera shots on the works of Turner and Zephaniah’s locks.

Goldie looked like he was lovin’ it. He saw Matisse as a joy-bringer,  raved about comfortable colours and hinted at Matisse as being one for the people.

Up Your Street community group is off to see Constable at the V&A in a couple of months but I tried to watch “Constable , a country rebel” on TV late night the other night. Too too boring . I still have to plough through the “Abstract” series on BBC Four. Lordy Lord.

The word “Outsider” crept into the programmes I watched with Zephaniah describing himself as an outsider and empathising with ole Turner. Really? Didn’t get that. I did get that Goldie was the only black man in Tate Modern that day and that I’ve never in my life seen a Rasta in any posh gallery. Oh Beeb and your diverse ways.

Up to my neck in Outsider Art having been to Seniors’ Art School in Southwark Park. Saw a doodly exhibition and lots of minutiae in biro. I’d been to the BowArts exhibition of Madge Gill’s work as it was pulled from the archives. This was my first conscious sighting of “Outsider Art” and it took me two hours to think positively about the scribbles. I am not that interested in the biography of the artist or hearing any pseudo psycho-analysis about an artist in glorious retrospect. Just let me soak up the work and see if my judgemental spirit responds well.

At the workshops we participants followed through tasks to redefine drawing per se. No easy task to fiddle around with charcoal, pencil, ink , 30 pieces of A3 paper. wobbly easels, moving images, Charlie Mingus’ airs and artspeke in half an hour. No sir. We were to loosen our perceptions of what drawing should or might be so we stroked and dotted in time to Mingus. We became ambidextrous experimenting with our other hand and lapping quilled ink over wax crayon or felt tip inside pencil-drawn spirals. The hostility towards the tutor ebbed and flowed depending on the awkwardness of the task.

In the afternoon we were allowed to use biro to draw. We used postcard-sized paper and drew, scribbled, doodled, cut and pasted as in days of old, hardly laughed, felt uncomfortable and were a superficial “we”.

Another journey begins.