Up Your Street. Issue 3

Issue 3 Up Your Street

Tues 24th Jan   £1. 10-1pm Hilary’s Tuesday’s Sociable Sewing at The Mill, Coppermill Lane E17

Wed 25th Jan   £5   1-4pm Chingford Assembly Hall E4 tea dance

                         £4   noon-3pm Posh Club at St Paul’s in Stoke Newington. Need to book for the cabaret and high tea.

Thurs 26th Jan free 3-5pm Gants Hill Library. Eastside Community Heritage launches the exhibition

From Cinema to Synagogue

Fri 27th   Jan    free  2.30-4pm Art 4 all. Leytonstone Library E11. Shadow Puppetry.

Sun 29th Jan   free Open Day at Organiclea

“Seasonal Blitz: our weekend volunteering opportunity, join us at 9.45 for a 10am-1pm session, preparing for wildflower planting. We advise sturdy shoes and you are welcome to stay for the Hawkwood monthly Open Day afterwards. Please do let us know in advance if you’d like to join us for the Seasonal Blitz session, by emailing plants[at]organiclea.org.uk or call us on 020 8524 4994.

Open Day (12-4pm)

All afternoon (12 – 4) Coffee, cake and delicious locally grown lunch served.

1pm Join Lee Valley Nature Photographers for a walk and talk with bird identification on site and sharing information on birdlife in the wider Lea Valley. We are participating in the RSPB’s Local Big Garden Birdwatch, on of the biggest species surveys in the world. Suitable for all from expert to first-timer – all welcome. There will be some binoculars to borrow – or bring your own if you have them. We are really pleased to be doing this in partnership with LVNP.

2.30pm Site tour

12-3pm Hawkwood Woodland School – a drop-in family learning session offering outdoor play and holistic learning for children and families. All children must be accompanied by an adult. Please email londonforestschool@gmail.com with the name and age of your children if you plan to attend, so we have an idea of numbers. There is no charge for this session.”

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Issue 2 Up Your Street

 

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Mon 16th Jan    £5 or £3 if Newham resident 1.30-4.30pm Tea dance Stratford Old Town Hall E15

Tues   17th Jan free 1.15-1.45pm  Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology. Crochet pots and a talk by the artist.

£8 7.30-9pm  Hatha Yoga   The Good Shepherd Main Hall, Pastures Youth Centre, Davies Lane, Leytonstone, E11 3DR
Stretch, strengthen and relax into the evening in a Hatha flow yoga class. Focus in your mind, comfort your body and settle your soul. Open to all abilities, bodies and budgets!

Highly recommended by Up Your Street and Jessica is a great tutor.

Wed  18th Jan    free 11-6pm at Autograph Gallery in Rivington Street. Ongoing exhibition. Tours available. “an alternative portrait of the Calais ‘Jungle’

Gideon Mendel: Dzhangal Free exhibition | Until 11 February Autograph ABP, London

Thurs 19th Jan   free 6-8pm Film about “Wonder Woman” (1970) at same place as crochet pots, (see above).

free 6-8.30pm Launch of Exhibition. “The Silvertown Explosion” with Graham Hill at St Luke’s Community Centre, Canning Town, E16.

Fri    20th Jan     free Hand in your print art to The Mill E17 (Fiver for a submission). You need to be resident or working/volunteering/caring in Walthamstow.

Sat   21st Jan    free 11-2pm at Hale End Library. CreativiTEA . Mindfulness with painting. Booked up but try your luck because always there are spare seats.

Sun   22nd Jan  free  12.30-3pm. Made In Hackney .Cooking up 15 minute meals

Made In Hackney Local Food Kitchen, Food For All Basement, 3 Cazenove Rd, London, N16 6PA.(106 bus).

Booked up but try by emailing info@madeinhackney.org

You eat what you make and sometimes take surplus home.

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Issue 3 Up Your Street

 

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Wed 14th Jan £5 Stratford Theatre Royal east . The Stratford East Singers evening show at 7.30pm. Book online

Sat 17th Jan free  1.45-4pm  Brick making like the Victorians. At Bow’s Chisenhale Centre, 64 Chisenhale Road E3. Book at Eventbrite. Wear a pinny.

Mon 19th Jan free 11 am Book at  CreativeMornings Ldn website for a place to Friday’s session  entitled UGLY. Tickets go very quickly. Usually a free croissant breakfast, 20 minute talk from the rostrum then networking. Worth a peek.

Tues 20th Jan free David Boote leads and guides on another free walk.

:”Escape across the Marshes “(part 1 of Tottenham Outrage walk)

11 am.Tottenham Hale Station > Higham Hill W15 bus stop; option to continue to Highams Park Station

7pm (donation)  The Mill Coppermill Lane E17 Mill Book Club analysing and appreciating “The Blackwater Lightship “.

Wed 21st Jan £3 POSH dance. Tea dance at St Paul’s Church Amhurst Road and Stoke Newington Road . Strictly posh gear.wpid-img_95315535709391.jpegBook on 02077374043

                                 free 11-1pm Leyton Library E10 Exhibition all about memories of the Great War at Whipps Cross Hospital with Eastside Community Heritage . Tickets at Eventbrite

Thurs 22nd Jan free  4.30-6.30pm Hackney Museum. Local  Roots project launch with students entertaining. Always a great welcome. Book at Eventbrite

Fri 23rd Jan       free  8.30-10am..  AM …68, Hanbury St E1 Creatives meet up. Book last Mondayjam

Sat 24th Jan     free  2-4pm   Chisenhale tour E3  . Book at Eventbrite

                              free   2-5pm Party launch sign up to volunteer event at Bishopsgate Institute all about ye olde Centerprise in Hackney. No need to book.

 £5 plus 80p booking charge. All weekend 20 minute tours of Alexandra Palace, N8.

Mon 26th Jan free   10-3pm Toynbee Hall E1 .Conference via AgeUK “Ageing without children”. Buffet lunch  . Book at Eventbrite

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Floating Cinema

Boiling I was to be sitting on a moving boat in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park with the curtains drawn and the expectation of seeing art installations dashed. I was on a boat with a speaker promoting his supervision of art projects mainly oop North and no knowledge of the River Lea. Imagine! What rhymes with slap?

And then came Jo Bell’s poetry. She is the watery Canal Laureate.* What? Her poem, what we heard of it because moving boats like barges make scraping rumbling noises as they sludge along and obliterate sound tracks on Powerpoint, was Plathy but I will visit it on Google somewhere so as to raise my positives.

Stuck in a boat and nowhere to run. Stuck on a boat in a  too-small life-jacket wondering how really communities along waterways are engaged through art when 33% of water-users when asked will have no truck with such Hirsts and the nod to diversity is shown through some rehearsed South Asian dancing next to a lock. One -offs and we ain’t fooled for one minute.

Time up and the rain was pelting down outside in the desert of yellow tarmac that is the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

floater 1

Back into the Floating Cinema after five minutes for mulled wine and old films and new about rivers. Now all was relevant for when you talk ‘rivers’  you talk  ‘Thames’ and then along come the inevitable rosily filmed chummy films about the London Docks back in the day. But that today was good for Up Your Street subscribers are on the Eastside Community Heritage course about shipbuilding herstories. As far as I’m concerned after seeing brilliant films from 1917 up to 2011 we’ve covered the life of a docker,  the magnificence of  big ships, exports and imports, wool and tobacco, tea and sugar and the life of men. Job done. Ah, this part of the Floating Cinema day out was just great what with friendly Simon and the Park volunteer who spoilt us with warm wine and blankets. It was very cold but hey it’s winter. We were on a boat in a treeless place with wind and rain all about us. We sandwiched and crunched nuts. Two others rustled their choccie papers oblivious of the silence of a silent film. It was like a proper pictures.

We were so happy we went despite some people getting muddled up on their ticket times, others losing their way and never getting on board and one of us had a returned phobia of all things wet and watery so she scarpered….into Westfield, where else?

I gave my friend my copy of Len Taphouse’s “Spirit of the Iroquois” all about ships and knots. I’d introduced a young couple to the Floating Cinema and the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park as well as senior members from the area around the Park.  I’d been on board The Floating Cinema before the Olympic and Paralympics 2012 and thoroughly enjoyed my tour of the waterways in the making besides being in the company of Mr Michael Smith. He never knew he was in my company. His films were shown today “Drift Street” (2011) and “Mystery River”(2013). Fantastic. (Goof: watch the milk flagon in “Drift”). And I loved the music by Tim and  Matthew Olden  on the film “Barging Through London” (2011).

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Look what I found for FREE. Nov 29th 3.30-5pm Book at Eventbrite. Wrap up WARMly

To mark the final weekend of Newton’s Cottage we will be celebrating with a series of performances and a toast to the project. Please join us for dance, poetry, warm drinks and more.

Performances begin at 3.30pm and include:

Poetry by Jo Bell
The Canal Poet Laureate, Jo Bell will perform her specially commissioned response to Newton’s Cottage along side reciting a series of her work that relate to the waterways.

Dance by Jorge Crecis
Working with East London Dance, this piece of dance will respond to the unique environment of Newton’s Cottage and will bring the structure to life with a contemporary choreographed piece.

Presentation of Newton’s Cottage by Ruud Reutelingsperger
Hear more about the aspirations and inspirations for Newton’s Cottage along with learning about how this artwork was built and where it is going to go next.

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* this my clause has been used by The Guardian before me.

Masala Chai with Eastside Community Heritage

tea

People who subscribe to Up Your Street represent all the diverse ethnicity of residents in places around the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and because they’re of the New Generation (phrase coined from a Soapbox participant meaning that for the first time seniors aged beautifully 50 up to 90 say have accidentally created the first definite cohort rather than being the older generation which meant the invisible crowd. “New Generation suits.”) they have seen and experienced multi-culturalism in its flourishing wave in the eighties. So those assembled at today’s reminiscence tea knew of chai and Indian sweets and snacks. They eat and cook all foods, make cheese sandwiches and samosas, drink Lassi and tea from every plant. No flies on them. They managed to gobble all the sugar on the table.

The scene was set at Valentine’s Mansion being the tea time scene of a rich Indian family circa 1914. The meat was in the questions posed by Eastside Community Heritage, questions that forced debate and family memories, individual opinions and a willingness to learn from each other. We discussed Ghurkhas, Trinidadian dads with gas masks, second-hand tea leaves, telly programmes about Indians in the British Army, “Who Do You Think You Are?” recruitment of boy soldiers, and so much more emphasising that we were not surprised that millions of Indian men served under George Vth : first hand stories from granddaughters sitting drinking masala chai on a hot September afternoon in the wild grounds of an ancient mansion added to our received knowledge gleaned over years of self-learning and curiosity.

We had enjoyed one of the best community engagement projects this side of the moon equalled by East London In Flux”.

I woz community engaged.

Today I had faith restored in the phrase “community engagement”. I had booked a party into Eastside Community Heritage’s afternoon tea party. The event was planned to acknowledge WW1. We came together  at Valentine’s Mansion in Gant’s Hill. It’s easy enough to get to, just on the Central Line. The squirrels and Canada Geese never disappoint and came out in their Autumn colours today. The park isn’t too manicured and the Mansion is a treat and a half.

I took delight in seeing our hostess Judith Garfield turn away people because she had emphasised on the  promotion via social media that booking was a must.

The tea room for this programme was gorgeous, full of lilacs and mauves, green leafy wallpaper, pretty prettiness and twee crockery. The room was full as we launched into Victoria sponge, loose tea brewed and poured through a strainer, stories of family sit-down for your tea teas, stories of coming to UK shores, memories of stern fathers and a presentation from Gerrard of Redbridge Museum in which he produced an home-made “iron biscuit”.

 

afternoon teaPhoto :copywrite belongs to Eastside Community Heritage. 2014.

There were stories of servants, and Mauritian vanilla tea, Russian samovars and dumplings, Valentine’s Mansion as an infants’ clinic, a housing department and right back in time as having melons and orangeries. There was respect for parents during wars and poverty feeding families on very little, rations or not. We came from Kenya, from Mauritius, from L’ile de Reunion, Leyton, Whitechapel, Woodford and beyond.

We talked of fly cups, puckles of coffee, going without salt, recycling cooking oil, making cups from discarded bottles and tins.

We played games and were thus lulled into reminiscing, tears and laughing.

Now for my real tea.